Surfing the Sea

Since 1995

My Story… — Jul 7, 2015

My Story…

Since I haven’t introduced myself in the last post, I’ll do it right here.

myartvsartist
My Art vs. Artist

My name is Sabrina Gardiner, born in 1995 in the north of green England. From the fledgling age of two years old, I always loved to put my pencils (or at that time, a felt-tip pen) on to pieces of paper to reveal the machinations of my imagination to the outer world.

Once I’d grown out of the phase of scrawling uncontrollably about all over my canvases (which included walls), I began to morph those marks into intelligible characters. My specialism was creating fan stories of my favourite cartoon characters, personifications with flags and educational books.

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The big change came for me when I turned 11 years old and moved to the far-flung country of Colombia. During the year and a half I lived over there, some of the mainstays of my characters would develop, as with a fascination with the months of the year that would last me a good couple of years.

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As I grew into my teenage years and returned to England, I needed to create more realistic characters while at the same time keeping that unmistakable fantasy feel. At this time, I had re-ignited my interest in geography after going on a road trip around the south of England, and so began on a mission to personify every place in every country, beginning with my green homeland.

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Completing (or mostly completing) my personification throughout England, the next logical step would be to go stateside and get on to personifying the United States. But I added a new twist that I hadn’t done with England – personify each state as well as the cities and towns they contained. This allowed me to explore even deeper into the country’s geography by looking at the cultures of each state to see what made each one different.

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But the real passion of mine started with me taking a detour at the cinema when the movies I was watching got mixed up. From there, I came across Canada.

Initially creating just one character as I did not expect to become too interested in Canada, the country suddenly began to take over, effectively ending my exploration of the States. At first I did not want to become interested as I wasn’t too much into Canada, but it then grew on me, eventually becoming my most favourite country.

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As I began to work more and more with Canada, a personal goal of emigrating over there began to form, which I still hold today and hope to realize in the near future. Every new artwork I create for the country makes my wish stronger and more determined to make my Canadian dream a reality.

Although I’ve been drawing characters for as long as I can remember, I only recently started to bring them to life on the screen. Initially creating short animations to hone my animating skills, these then evolved into fully-fledged episodes, one of which I am hoping to create a voiceover for. My ultimate dream is that these will eventually transfer to the small and big screens to capture the imaginations and inspire generations of animators to come.

And live in Canada, of course.

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Purple vs. Violet — Nov 27, 2019

Purple vs. Violet

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Purple and violet are not the same thing. The colour popularly called “purple” in everyday parlance is often actually not purple at all, at least not according to the artistic definition of it.

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While purple and violet are both made by mixing red and blue, purple tends to lean more towards red, while violet has a little more blue. So if you’re wearing a dress or shirt that looks like the one below, it would be more accurate to call it “violet” rather than “purple”, as per the diagram above. This may also be why the seventh colour of the rainbow is called the former rather than the latter, as it typically appears bright with the sun shining through the rain.

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Now you know the difference!

💜

(More at this Curiosity article)

Pokémon Sword and Shield (2019): A Pre-Review — Nov 19, 2019

Pokémon Sword and Shield (2019): A Pre-Review

(SPOILERS AHEAD! I’m doing this as a pre-review because I don’t yet have a Nintendo Switch, but if I do get one, it’ll become a proper review.)

A new generation of Pokémon has arrived yet again – and this time, it’s a little closer to home…

Continue reading

Nova Scotians on Bonfire Night (2019) — Nov 5, 2019

Nova Scotians on Bonfire Night (2019)

Nova Scotian Bonfire Night
Nova Scotian Bonfire Night

Bring out the fireworks and sparklers – it’s Bonfire Night again! 🎆🎇

In case you didn’t know, Bonfire Night – AKA Guy Fawkes Night – is an annual celebration held every 5th of November in the United Kingdom and some other Commonwealth territories. It commemorates the day Guy Fawkes and his gang of conspirators failed to bomb the Houses of Parliament in London in 1605, in an attempt to assassinate King James I of England. (I go into more detail on the origins of Bonfire Night in this post.)

With Canada being part of the Commonwealth, a leftover from the days of the British Empire, I was surprised to see that – with the exception of Newfoundland – Bonfire Night is almost relatively unknown across the Atlantic. While it’s not really about them or their parliament, I had wrongly assumed that it was a shared celebration across the Commonwealth, as they are all tied to Britain.

But geography doesn’t really matter, as some of the cast of A Nova Scotian Way of Life (ANSWOL) have come together for a fireworks show of their own. The fireworks were drawn with glitter pens, giving the impression that they’re “popping” out of the night sky. Westville and Parrsboro even have sparklers sizzling away while the bonfire burns bright. This is also Truro and Yarmouth’s first Bonfire Night as a married couple (it feels like it was their wedding just yesterday!)

If you’re having a bonfire or a fireworks display of your own, or are going to a public one, safety is always important. Why not see these safety tips?

http://www.bonfire-night-safety.co.uk/

Remember, remember the 5th of November – and to protect and enjoy yourself!

🎆🎇

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Nova Scotians in Halloween Costumes (2019) — Oct 31, 2019

Nova Scotians in Halloween Costumes (2019)

Nova Scotians in Halloween Costumes
Nova Scotians in Halloween Costumes

It’s that time of the year again! The whole cast of A Nova Scotian Way of Life (ANSWOL) is getting into the spooky mood with their Halloween costumes.

Everyone wears a costume that has something to do with their hometown, with the exception of a few who are just wearing ordinary clothes because I either couldn’t think up a costume for them, or they don’t celebrate Halloween for whatever reason. (Maybe it’s too scary for them?)

If you’re familiar with Nova Scotia, or live there, some of the costumes will be pretty obvious to you. For example, Lunenburg is the Bluenose II, a famous sailing boat built as a replica of the original Bluenose, which was a several-time winner of the America’s Cup in the 1920s and 30s. Oak Island is a pirate, owing to an everlasting legend that a secret stash of pirate treasure has been buried there, on which a popular reality TV series is now based. Berwick and Oxford are an apple and a blueberry respectively, owing to their hometowns’ natural abundance of these fruits. (Berwick’s apple costume even has some worms wriggling through it for extra spookiness!) Others are just for fun, like Hantsport and Stewiacke’s wizard and devil costumes, James River’s beaver costume (because his last name is Beaverton), and Pugwash as Captain Pugwash (get it?) 🤣

If you don’t celebrate Halloween, just have a great day. If you do, though, have a Happy Halloween, and may it be filled with lots of treats, not tricks!

🎃👻🍭🍬🍫

Happy Halloween 2019
Happy Halloween 2019
Canadian Thanksgiving 2019 — Oct 14, 2019

Canadian Thanksgiving 2019

Happy Thanksgiving! Why am I saying Thanksgiving this early? Because I’m talking about Canadian Thanksgiving! 🇨🇦🍁🦃

Nova Scotian Thanksgiving Feast
Nova Scotian Thanksgiving Feast

While it’s often thought of as the quintessential American autumnal celebration, Thanksgiving in Canada actually predates the arrival of the pilgrims to America by about half a century. It’s said that Martin Frobisher first observed the celebration on his 1578 voyage to the famed Northwest Passage, the gateway to Asia from Europe. His celebration was soon copied by French colonists and Americans who remained loyal to Britain, who brought over turkey and pumpkins from down south, making Thanksgiving the occasion it is today. Canadian Thanksgiving is observed a month before its southern cousin, every second Monday in October.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my Canadian readers and followers, and take pride in the fact you celebrate Thanksgiving first! 😉😄

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