My travels in Nova Scotia were just about coming to a close, but I couldn’t spend it just lazing around in the hotel all day just watching TV or typing away at my computer (which, ironically, is what I’m doing right now). I’d pretty much seen all of what Halifax had to offer at this point, so for the first time on this holiday, we headed outside of Halifax to visit the small fishing village of Peggy’s Cove on the Atlantic coast. (Technically, Peggy’s Cove is still Halifax, as it’s part of the Halifax Regional Municipality.)

Peggy’s Cove is famous with those who travel to Nova Scotia because of its lighthouse, which some say is the most photographed lighthouse in the world. The village was apparently named after the sole survivor of a nearby shipwreck, whose name was Margaret (or Peggy, to give the nickname).

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Foggy Peggy’s Cove lighthouse

Today, it seems no-one can go to Peggy’s Cove without snapping one or two (or even more) photos of the lighthouse. That is exactly what I did when I came to the village.

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Foggy Peggy’s Cove lighthouse and village
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Foggy Peggy’s Cove lighthouse
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Foggy Peggy’s Cove lighthouse up close

As well as snapping numerous photos of the lighthouse for Instagramming, we also admired the awe-inspiring power of the rough sea waves crashing upon the rocky shore. A few days prior, a huge storm swept Nova Scotia, causing choppy seas out in the Atlantic Ocean and eventually reaching the eastern seaboard of Canada. Some people have actually died trying to admire the strong waves and getting swept away by the force, drowning or being crushed against the rocks.

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Rough seas at Peggy’s Cove, NS
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Rough seas at Peggy’s Cove, NS
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Rough waves at Peggy’s Cove, NS

After getting a good enough look of the lighthouse and the rough waves, we visited a small gift shop just up on the shore, where I found a vast array of Nova Scotian goodies, like keyrings, mugs, snow globes and hats. I even found some real live locally-caught fresh lobsters in a tank… and some Nova Scotia toilet paper!

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Fresh Nova Scotia lobsters in a tank
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Fresh Nova Scotia lobsters in a tank

As we headed back to Halifax, the fog slowly began to lift, giving way to some beautiful sea, forest and lakescapes. Once we arrived back in Halifax, we had some lunch at a Mexican restaurant, where we had burritos with chips, sweetcorn, tortillas and a cheesecake! We then relaxed a little by going to Victoria Park, where I found a statue of Robert Burns, the Bard of Scotland (I told you, Nova Scotia means “New Scotland” in Latin) and walking around nearly the whole perimeter of Citadel Hill, enjoying spectacular views of Dartmouth and the Angus L. MacDonald Bridge linking Halifax and Dartmouth.

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Robert Burns statue in Victoria Park
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Dartmouth and the Angus L. MacDonald Bridge from Citadel Hill

As we relaxed back in the hotel, I couldn’t help but feel sad that I couldn’t stay in Nova Scotia forever, as I’ve always dreamed. But I also felt happy that I would finally be returning to my London home after a week away. (An Inside Out reference there, maybe? Could Joy and Sadness be making a new happy and sad memory inside my Headquarters right now?)

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